Republican Senators Now Accused of “Co-Conspiracy” with Former President Trump

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Many people in America are facing some tough times as of late. Millions suffer from unemployment due to the pandemic and presently rely upon various unemployment programs from the government. Thanks to President Joe Biden’s removal of Keystone Pipeline, more blue-collar workers have joined the ranks of the jobless.

None of the aforementioned has caused Congress to reconsider its current fixation on an impeachment trial against an ex-president. The Democrat-controlled Congress is focusing its energies on trying to convict former President Donald Trump, rather than passing policies to better the economy.

Since the inception of the trial, it was very clear that Democrats lack the necessary 67 Senate votes to garner a conviction of the 45th president, yet this trial still remains ongoing.

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On Wednesday, twice-failed presidential candidate Hillary Clinton professed that if Republicans vote to acquit Trump, they’ll prove themselves to be “co-conspirators” of the former president.

Hillary Clinton on GOP senators

Like many others, Clinton isn’t hesitating to get her two cents in on the impeachment trial and the outcome she’d prefer. The twice-unsuccessful presidential candidate’s claim that Republicans who don’t vote for conviction are “co-conspirators” is not at all original; shortly before the Senate trial commenced, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi made similar remarks.

Pelosi ultimately asserted that the trial will determine whether the Senate is comprised of courage or cowardice. Clinton’s remarks mirror those of the current House Speaker’s; they also show the awareness that most Republicans are not going to vote for a conviction of the former president. The impeachment trial itself began with nearly every GOP senator agreeing that this trial lacks a constitutional basis.

During this week alone, Republicans in the Senate have also communicated their annoyance with this trial and its proceedings.

A deeply partisan impeachment trial

With the exception of senators like Mitt Romney, most GOP members are all but guaranteed to vote for an acquittal. In the likely event each Democrat votes to convict Trump, 17 votes from Republican senators are still required. The backing for conviction plainly does not exist.

Ultimately, the name-calling and petty insults from figureheads like Clinton and Pelosi have no bearing on the votes of GOP senators.