New CDC Study Links Stress in Teens to Drug and Alcohol Abuse

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For years on end, people have rightfully sounded the alarm about teenagers using drugs and alcohol. Teens remain ill-equipped to handle these substances; moreover, they can be deadly, especially when blended or rapidly ingested.

Today, most parents go above and beyond to keep their kids away from illicit narcotics and booze. However, a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shines a light on key factors driving children to ingest noxious substances.

As one might imagine, knowing what motivates this epidemic goes hand in hand with finding a solution.

A dangerous coping mechanism

Unfortunately, many teenagers who struggle with personal relationships frequently turn to illicit substances to soothe the pain. The CDC documents that almost 75% of teens who abuse drugs and alcohol do so to rid themselves of stress and start feeling relaxed.

44% even admitted they rely upon harmful substances to fight depression and anxiety, do away with certain problems (at least temporarily), or forget about traumatic memories.